Professor uses Global Builders trips to broaden students’ perspective

Professor uses Global Builders trips to broaden students’ perspective

For Associate Professor of Business and Economics Henrique Cezar, Fuller Center Global Builders trips are more than just a chance for his students from Vermont’s Johnson State College to practice civic engagement and do some good in the world. They also are an opportunity to expose the students to diversity and cultural differences.

After leading students on Fuller Center Global Builders trips to Thailand, Nicaragua and, last year, Armenia, Cezar will take his team to work with The Fuller Center’s covenant partner in Trivandrum, India, this coming May.

Johnson State College’s student newspaper, Basement Medicine, has an outstanding piece about this service trip, featuring interviews with Cezar and students who will be making the trip.

Click here to read the complete article

SLIDESHOW: View each of the first 40 Fuller Center homes in India

SLIDESHOW: View each of the first 40 Fuller Center homes in India

The Fuller Center for Housing’s covenant partner in Trivandrum, in the state of Kerala, India, completed its 40th new home last week thanks to a team of hard-working Fuller Center Global Builders led by Kaye Hooker and Pamela Bland. You can view a few photos from their memorable trip at this link.

Before the trip, T.H. Lawrence, who leads our work in India, shared photos of the first 39 houses (we added the 40th in the slideshow below) in this blog post telling the story behind each of those homes. You can read his notes at this link and view photos of all 40 homes in the slideshow below.

Your support makes these milestones possible! Thank you!

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Local control, decision-making key part of our grass-roots ministry’s success

Local control, decision-making key part of our grass-roots ministry’s success

(This is part of regular series of blog posts related to The Fuller Center’s #MoreSmilesFewerShacks 2016 year-end campaign.)

The Fuller Center for Housing has seen an influx of new covenant partners over the past couple of years, especially from groups that formerly had been associated with other housing nonprofits. Reasons they often cite for joining The Fuller Center include having the ability to make decisions at the local level and not having to pay fees to a bureaucratic overseer where they consider their fees going too much toward overhead and not enough toward work in the field.

When Millard and Linda Fuller founded The Fuller Center in 2005, they saw it as an opportunity to return to the grass-roots, Christian principles with which they started the affordable housing movement more than 40 years ago. One of those principles was that day-to-day decisions are best left to local groups who know best what their local community’s needs are and the best ways to meet those challenges. They believed that headquarters’ role was to facilitate — and not dictate — the work in the field, in the United States or around the world. They also believed that local partners should be encouraged to tithe toward the ministry’s work elsewhere but never required to pay fees to be a part of the ministry.

ye-logoWe lost Millard in 2009, but The Fuller Center has not wavered in its grass-roots principles and never will. We still believe decisions are best made at the local level, and we do not require our local covenant partners to pay fees in order to go about their work in the field under our umbrella. We stand ready to help local partners in a multitude of ways, but, ultimately, the work is up to those hard-working folks in the mission field.

It’s one of the reasons The Fuller Center is succeeding in hard-to-work places like Haiti. While many U.S. outfits have parachuted into the country believing they know best how to work there, The Fuller Center worked to find Haitian partners willing and able to put our partnership housing principles into action.

When Millard and Linda Fuller founded The Fuller Center in 2005, they saw it as an opportunity to return to the grass-roots, Christian principles with which they started the affordable housing movement more than 40 years ago.

The Fuller Center’s mission is to help families have simple, decent places to live. That means different things in different places. To partners like Louisville and Philadelphia, that means resurrecting once-vacant, dilapidated properties and turning them into like-new homes. In Indianapolis, it means raising the walls of new homes. In Perry, Ga., and Tallahassee, Fla., it means repair projects like new roofs and wheelchair ramps. In El Salvador and Bolivia, it means building whole communities. In India and Nicaragua, they’re taking it one home at a time. And in places like Hammond, La., it’s new homes, repairs and helping people recover from historic flooding.

We encourage everyone to visit our international headquarters in Americus, Ga., but we must warn you that while it will be enlightening, it might not be terribly exciting. It’s a small, simple building with no fancy offices or lobby adorned with ornate fixtures. In fact, you might ask, “Is this it?” Well, yes it is. However, if you go visit our local partners, you will find excitement as that’s where the action and real work of this ministry happens. Sorry, though, you still won’t find any fancy offices. None is interested in overhead.

Local partners also happen to know best how to tell their stories. I hope that you will take a look at a couple of new short videos below — one produced by our partners in Philadelphia and one produced by our partners in Louisville. Both are fighting blight and empowering families by resurrecting vacant properties. It’s just one area of focus for our ministry, but it is one that they feel best suits their communities’ specific challenges.

When you consider your year-end giving options this year, be sure to support grass-roots nonprofits who direct your generosity to where it is truly needed — in the mission field.

click here to support
our year-end campaign


 

 

Indian Fuller Center dedicates 4th home in Kelakam, Kannur District; 38th overall

Indian Fuller Center dedicates 4th home in Kelakam, Kannur District; 38th overall

The Fuller Center’s covenant partner in India is based in Trivandrum — the largest city in the state of Kerala — but has been expanding its reach as it grows. On Monday, the Trivandrum Fuller Center dedicated its 38th house overall and its fourth in Kelakam, more than 250 miles north along the coast of the Arabian Sea. The latest build is for a Christian couple working to spread the Gospel in the area. They had lived with their two daughters in a rented home before learning about The Fuller Center through their local Assembly of God Worship Center in Kelakam. For photos and more about this home and others built by the Trivandrum Fuller Center, click the button below.

trivandrum fuller center blog

In this video, Trivandrum Fuller Center Chairman T.H. Lawrence talks about working with families of all faiths and how that fits with his Christianity: