Armenian family to get new home after three decades in shipping container

Armenian family to get new home after three decades in shipping container

After a devastating earthquake rocked the historic land of Armenia in 1988, thousands of families were provided temporary shelter by the Soviet Union in the form of empty metal shipping containers known as domiks. Unfortunately, many of those shelters were far from temporary and thousands still live in them following the collapse of the Soviet Union. Many of the families with whom The Fuller Center works in Armenia are domik dwellers — including the Bejanyan family living the village of Koti. Living about a mile from the border with Azerbaijan, with whom Armenia has a history of armed conflict. Not only has the Bejanyan family had to endure living in a container for more than 30 years, but it is riddled with bullet holes fired from across the border. At last, the Bejanyans will have a safe, new home, thanks to the Fuller Center of Armenia’s partnership with VivaCell-MTS. You can read their story below:

panorama armenia story

Tagged with ,
Chris Johnson
This post was written by
Chris Johnson is the Director of Communications for The Fuller Center for Housing, a multi-award-winning columnist for the Columbus (Ga.) Ledger-Enquirer and author of 4 books.

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: